Cancelled 2020 Tokyo Olympics

On March 24, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Requested the International Olympic Committee to postpone the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games. The press was of two minds about that side instigated the thought, since a day or two prior to a prominent member of the IOC publicly mentioned the possibility of postponement. The decision is one which just the IOC can make and, for a month before Abe’s announcement, national publications were full of will-they-or-won’t-they tales as the emergency level, until that time, the sense of urgency had not been acute in Japan.

Local officials kept reassuring the press there was no plan to call off or push the games even though it was not technically those officials’ call. But once Canada announced it would not be sending athletes, the pressure to do something became too much. By no means were press organizations caught off guard, and before the statement many outlets were trying to determine which cancellation or postponement would mean to Japan efficiently, because, of course, cash is and always has been the driving force behind Tokyo’s decision to obtain and then benefit from this right to hold the matches.

Most media, including NHK, went to professor emeritus Katsuhiro Miyamoto of Kansai University, an expert on sports economics, for amounts that could put the matter into perspective. The press was of two minds about that side instigated the thought, since a day or two prior to a prominent member of the IOC publicly mentioned the possibility of postponement. Breaking the postponement figures down, Miyamoto pointed out that if the Olympics were set off for a year, there could be an extra cost of ¥22.5 billion in terms of additional maintenance costs for venues and the Olympic Village.

Another ¥390 billion will be required by related groups to maintain their organizations set up for a year. And post-Olympics effects would require a hit of ¥218 billion because of a delay. In a March 16 article, the Asahi Shimbun specified a number of the peripheral financial damage by outlining the issue of securing venues in the event of postponement. Convention and exhibition centre Tokyo Big Sight is the most important press and broadcast centre for the Olympics, and a portion was booked this season from May until September. Tokyo Big Sight had intended to compensate for the loss of business next year with a complete schedule of events and thus, if the matches take place next summer, it is going to need to cancel those, which means paying penalties to contracted consumers.

Seven events should happen at Makuhari Messe in Chiba Prefecture, and the organizers booked the centre for five months this year beginning April 21. Throughout the identical five-month interval in 2019, Makuhari Messe held 373 events, including the Summer Sonic music festival. It might need to cancel events already scheduled for next year also. Nippon Budokan, the famous martial arts stadium in central Tokyo, which is slated to host Olympic judo and karate events, has less of an issue since it doesn’t have lots of reservations yet for next year, but elementary and junior high schools constantly require the place for sports competitions in the summer. Television network NBC paid the IOC $4.38 billion for the rights to the matches through 2020.

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